Safe Use of Medicines Is Important in Drug Abuse Prevention

Many cases of drug addiction started from mere curiosity. An error in the use of a prescription drug, for example, could have led to experimentation. In a typical case, the person probably enjoyed the euphoria he experienced when he first took the drug, and this made him use the drug repeatedly.

This is the same reason why parents have to be extra careful about the drugs they keep in their medicine chests. A young child may be tempted to try what a bottle in the chest contains, adding to the many cases described above.

Time and again, it’s been said that prevention is better than cure, and this applies to drug addiction: It is a lot better to prevent the problem from happening than to deal with it when it does occur. There are many ways by which drug abuse prevention is applied best, and one of these is in using drugs safely.

If a list of safe drug use is to be made in this regard, it will most probably be topped by this: A person should not take doses of drugs beyond what have been prescribed by his doctor. In addition to this, he should follow the instructions indicated on the medicine label to a tee.

Unused portions of medicines should not be saved for future use, unless this has been consulted to a doctor. Also, drugs that have been prescribed to you must not be shared with anyone else just because you think you have the same case of illness. There could be serious consequences – drug addiction included – if a person takes medicines or drugs that are not intended for him.

If a person feels he is ill and decides to see a doctor, he should provide enough information to the doctor about what he feels is wrong with him. This is important so that the doctor can prescribe the appropriate medication and treat him effectively. The person also has to make sure that the doctor knows all the drugs he uses regularly, whether these are nonprescription or prescription medications. This is to avoid the risk of drug interactions or over-dosage.

A person should keep a record of any bad reaction he has had to a drug prescribed to him. Such reaction may include getting into an intense state of euphoria. The person may mistake the condition for well-being, and here lies the potential for addiction or abuse as the person craves for more of the drug.

Child Drug Abuse Prevention Tips For Parents – 7 Ways to Help Promote Your Child’s Safety

Having an open caring relationship with an adult role model is a critical piece of preventing drug abuse in children.

Parents and primary care givers have a critical role in preventing children’s in involvement with drugs and alcohol. It is a virtual dead certainty that your child will come in contact with drugs and alcohol sooner rather than later. How they handle it can be largely determined by parental involvement and preparation. Please do not ignore this problem and hope it will simply go away. Here is why.

Some facts on child drug use. (Office of National Drug Control Policy)

o The single leading cause of death among youth is driving under the influence.

o The second leading cause is suicide. Drugs are present 60% of the time.

o The average age of first use of alcohol is 11 years old.

o Of children who use alcohol or drugs before age 15, 40% are later classified with an addiction.

No parent wants to see their child involved with drugs. The likelihood of a child associating with drug-using friends is reduced by a close relationship with their parents There are some specific steps you can take to help your child be properly prepared to meet the challenge of drugs and alcohol. Here they are:

1. Give clear messages and expectations that using drugs is not OK. Don’t assume your child knows your views, state them and make them clear as a bell.

2. Be a good, active listener. Be alert to both spoken and implied messages when you or your child is speaking about drugs. Have discussions not arguments.

3. Help with your child deal with peer pressure to use drugs. Review possible scenarios or listen to what has happened. Work out the possibilities both the pros and the cons of the situation as well as expected or potential outcomes. Help to plan appropriate actions and empower your child to act.

4. Get familiar with your child’s friends and parents. Meeting your children’s friends will give you a sense of their personalities, what they are “into”,” and their family situations. Don’t be too quick to judge a child’s friends, though. Radical styles and unconventional appearances may be nothing more than a badge of identity.

5. Know your child’s whereabouts. Children who had the least amount of monitoring or ‘latchkey’ kids are at greater risk of drug use and at earlier ages. Check up on your child’s whereabouts.

6. Supervise activities. Unsupervised parties or activities are an open invitation to drug use.

7. Have open, honest and sincere conversations with your child about using drugs and alcohol and the consequences.

These tips are just the tip of the iceberg on proactive steps you can take as parents in protecting and preparing your child for exposure to drugs and alcohol use. More information and resources are freely available

Drug Abuse Prevention

As with so many of today’s social ills, the use of mind altering drugs and hallucinogenic substances became popular back in the sixties, along with the rise in sexual promiscuity, gang violence, teenage rebellion and many other social anomalies. This is also the time when we would begin seeing the beginnings of the dismantling of the traditional family structure, a key element in any drug abuse prevention effort. So the task of dealing with this menacing element of today’s society is more challenging. This is not to say however that drug abuse prevention is not doable it only makes it tougher when there is little to no strong family support.

So How Do We Tackle This 50-Year-Old Problem?

Two words: “Early education.” We can no longer afford to wait until a child is beyond his/her formidable years and on into the teenage and adolescence stages of their lives before we begin talking about the dangers of getting involved with drugs. We live in a very corrupt society and our kids are exposed to the ills and ugliness almost from conception. They watch violence and drug use on TV. Drugs and gang violence has even made it into the video games kids are playing. Children in the inner cities across America are all too familiar with the local neighborhood dealers. And on and on it goes.

Therefore a truly effective drug abuse prevention program must start at an early age in the child’s life. After all we are talking about prevention, which by definition means to “not allow”. Once a person becomes involved with drugs, you’re beyond the prevention stages and into the curing and rehabilitating stage.

Early education about the consequences of drug use can take on, and frankly should, take on many different forms, and involve several segments of the society. First and foremost the child needs parental guidance. Unfortunately today’s family structure as mentioned above may not always be ideal or as strong as it should be for a number of different reasons. Nevertheless some form of structured leadership within the home is vital to the success of a drug abuse prevention for children and adolescence.

Teachers and educators in our school system have a huge role to play in convincing kids of the dangers awaiting them with that first puff of Pot. Our education system must take a stronger stand in this endeavor, as more often than not, young kids have certain teachers they see as role models, and these are the people who can truly make a difference in this fight. Clergy and other religious organizations can and should step up as well. As leaders in the communities, they own as much of this problem as anyone.

And what about the rest of us? Should we stand by and wait for the government to come up with effective drug abuse prevention laws and measures? If that’s what you’re waiting for…Good Luck! And if you are of the belief that there’s nothing you can do to help resolve this issue, you’re dreadfully mistaking, for there’s lots you can do:

Start an after-school mentoring program
Become a softball, flag football, soccer coach
Become a tutor. Help kids with their homework
Give a child an after-school job
Join a “Big Brother/Big Sister” organization
Etc., etc., etc.

If enough of us can find ways to somehow place ourselves smack dab in the middle of a kid’s leisure time, we can become part of the most effective drug abuse prevention program ever. Hillary Clinton once said, “It takes a village to raise a child.” And she was right.

Drug Abuse Prevention In The Sports World:

One of the most unfortunate trends in the whole arena of drug abuse is the recent rise in abuse found among our major athletes. These men and women are our heroes. Our kids look up to them and want to be just like them. Developing a drug abuse prevention program for athletes is absolutely crucial. This is especially true when we consider the number of body-builders, wrestlers, football players, and other athletes whose lives were cut short because of substance abuse.

The world of sports thrives on competition. Being the best you can be. Getting that competitive edge over the other guy. And too often our bright young men and women risk their lives pursuing that “one little something” that will give them the edge and make them faster, bigger, stronger. Clearly finding the answer to drug abuse prevention for our young athletes will be a daunting task. But it can, and must be done.

One approach might be to consider using the drug-abusing athletes themselves.

“I’m sick, and I’m scared. Ninety percent of the athletes I know are on the stuff. We’re not born to be 300 pounds or jump 30 feet. But all the time I was taking steroids…My hair’s gone, I wobble when I walk and have to hold onto someone for support, and I have trouble remembering things. My last wish? That no one else ever dies this way.”

These are the words of professional football player, Lyle Alzado, before he died as a result of his steroids use. Who knows how many youngsters could be saved if we implemented a program that required athletes found guilty of drug abuse, to spend time with young high school and college hopefuls, warning them of the dangers of using performance enhancing drugs.

Legal Drug Abuse Prevention:

Lastly let’s talk a bit about the “pill poppers”. You know those people who think they cannot live without their, painkillers, sleeping pills, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, etc. This group of individuals might just be the easiest group to help with a drug abuse prevention program. I say this because these people by and large have made themselves sick primarily by way of inadequate, nutrient-deficient diets. The old adage, “You are what you eat” is so true. Eating chemically processed foods and trans fatty fast foods is beginning to take its toll on the American society and many other cultures around the world.

The lack of readily available good wholesome nutritional foods is what causes many of the ailments that lead to loss of sleep, muscle tension, hyper activity, and other conditions that have individuals seeking drug relief from their physicians to fight these ills.

Fix the food nutrition problem in this country and you just may find another answer to effective drug abuse prevention for a number of pill poppers.